Fennel is my F-Bomb

Long ago, The Gourmet Dad, by Dean McDermott, caught my attention on a Denver bookstore shelf. It promised “Easy and Delicious Meals the Whole Family will Love.” It had great recipes that included  modified versions to appeal to children. A surreptitious photograph of book cover was taken to remember to look at the book in more detail after the trip.

Stumbling on that photo a couple of years later prompted a visit to Amazon and subsequent purchase of the electronic version of the cookbook. It does have some very good grown up recipes; even the kid versions sound good. The books photos attest to the plating skills of an accomplished professional chef and inspire emulation.

McDermott has a wife and five children which seems to a cadre of sous chefs in the house to help with the prep of the books “easy” meals.  There are no quibbles with the “delicious” description.

The below recipe with the Fennel F-word begged to be made. Seared scallops with it made it imperative! As a single empty-nester with no sous chests around, prep for most recipes takes some time. This recipe was worth the time on multiple levels. As a desert dweller, using watercress was a new adventure well worth the price for a handful. Who knew it has a peppery bite! It is always a thrill to try something new. McDermot’s instruction on searing scallops is simple and produces beautiful results. Gaining a new skill is always appreciated.

McDermott’s original recipe is for four salad servings topped with two scallops each. Hah! Reducing the volume of apple and fennel and upping the count of scallops to six per serving and the addition of a little garlic and  herb bread made in a meal instead of a side dish.  No point on shorting oneself on scallops, or fennel! A bonus was some leftover roasted shallot vinaigrette for another evening.

Seared scallops and apple and fennel salad justify the use of the F-word FENNEL!!!

Seared Scallops, Shaved Apples and Fennel
with Roasted Shallot Vinaigrette
 

Vinaigrette
Ingredients
4 shallots, peeled and cut lengthwise into quarters
2 Tbsp olive oil, plus ½ cup
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
2 sprigs fresh thyme, minced
2 sprigs fresh rosemary, minced
Juice of 1 orange
Juice and zest of ½ lemon
2 cloves garlic, minced
Salad
Ingredients
8 sea scallops
1 Honeycrisp apple, cored and thinly sliced (may substitute Pink Lady, Gala or Jonagold)
2 fennel bulbs, stem trimmed and shaved
Juice of 2 lemons, halves reserved
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
2 Tbsp grapeseed oil
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
1 bunch watercress, all but ½ inch of the stems removed
1/8 cup hazelnuts, toasted and crushed, plus 1/8 cup for garnish
Method
Preheat oven to 400°
Spread shallots on a baking sheet. Drizzle with 2 Tbsp of the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with the thyme and two springs’ worth of the rosemary. Roast the shallots until tender, 10 – 12 minutes.

Allow the roasted shallots to cool, then mince them. Combine them with the remaining rosemary, orange juice, lemon juice and zest and garlic in a small bowl and mix well. Whisk in the remaining ½ cup olive oil and season the vinaigrette with salt and pepper.

Pat the scallops dry and allow them to come to room temperature. In the meantime, combine the apple, fennel, lemon juice and lemon halves in a medium bowl and set aside.

Preheat a large sauté pan over high heat. Using a sharp knife, carefully score the top of each scallop in a crisscross pattern and season both sides with salt and pepper and a drizzle of grapeseed oil.

When the pan is hot, carefully place the scallops in it with the crosshatched side down. Do not move the scallops until they release from the pan, about 3 – 4 minutes to get the best sear and coloring.
Once the crisscross side releases and is a golden brown, flip the scallops and add the butter.  Once the butter has melted, baste the scallops a few times and then remove the pan from the heat. Residual heat from the pan will finish cooking the scallops to perfection.

Drain the reserved apple-fennel mixture and discard the lemon halves.  In a large salad bowl, toss have the watercress with the fennel-apple mixture. Add the reserved vinaigrette and 1/8 cup of the crushed hazelnuts and toss gently. Season with salt and pepper.
 
Arrange the salad on four salad plates, and top each with two scallops. Scatter the remaining watercress on top and garnish with the remaining hazelnuts and serve.

Notes: I forgot to buy hazelnuts, so I didn’t use them this time.  I wonder how pecans might work instead. The garlic cloves I uses were quite strong, but mellowed nicely in the dressing as it sat on the counter for a few minutes.

 

 

Chard No. 3

The “3 Ways to Use Chard” feature in Cooking Light magazine has been the source of some great meals over the past several days. Chard with Shaved Fennel started the binge. Fennel is always a siren’s call around here. Then came Charred Chard and Shallots, just because it was fun to say out loud and charring greens in the oven or on the grill is a taste treat that keeps greens interesting. Completing the trifecta was a Sweet Potato and Chard Salad. The clincher on that one is farro.

It wouldn’t be honest to say the chard binge is over. There’s another bunch in the crisper awaiting another chard challenge.

Sweet Potato and Chard Salad with a sprinkle of scallions.
The salad was just right with that second pork chop from the package!

SWEET POTATO AND CHARD SALAD
 Ingredients
10 oz  cubed sweet potato – about ½ inch
6 oz chopped rainbow chard
1 cup hot cooked farro
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp tarragon vinegar
¼ tsp kosher salt
¼ tsp black pepper
2 Tbsp sliced scallions

Method
Cook sweet potato in 4 cups water over medium-high heat. Bring water to a boil and reduce to medium low for three minutes. Stir in chopped chard and cook until wilted, about 2 minutes. Drain well.
Combine potatoes and chard, the cooked farro, olive oil, vinegar and salt and pepper. Toss well to combine. Sprinkle with sliced scallions.

Notes:

This salad will be a hit at the next potluck dinner gathering.

Follow package directions for cooking farro. You can put the farro and water in the refrigerator overnight to soak and reduce it’s cooking time. This works with steel cut oatmeal, too. The texture and nutty flavor of farro made this salad extra special.

Good ol’ El Paso groceries… it took shopping in three stores to find tarragon vinegar. The Heinz tarragon vinegar was a disappointment.  It was very weak and not really vinegary nor was there much tarragon flavor. Even with more than the recipe called for, it was sad. Next time I’m out of town, I’ll search for a more potent brand.

Charred Chard

Doing fun things with greens keeps them exciting. Grilled romaine and steamed curly endive are welcome changes on the menu at my house.  I found a recipe for charred chard. I enjoyed saying charred chard out loud (I’m easily amused). Saying “charred chard” three times must have been a mystical incantation because then the recipe demanded to be made.

Charred chard and shallots compliment a pan-grilled pork chop and a few grape tomatoes.

Charred Chard and Shallots

Ingredients
1 lb rainbow chard
1/2 cup sliced shallots
cooking spray
1/4 cup golden raisins
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
1/8 tsp kosher salt and 1/2 tsp black pepper

Method
Spray two baking sheets with cooking spray. Trim stems from rainbow chard. Divide chard leaves and shallots evenly between prepared pans. Spray vegetables lightly with cooking spray. Broil on high, one pan at a time until most of the chard is wilted and some is partially charred – 4 to 5 minutes.

Chop cooked chard into large pieces. Place chard mixture on a platter, top with golden raisins, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper.

Notes
Do you ever really measure 1/8 of a teaspoon of anything? I keep a jar with a mix of 40% coarse ground black pepper and 60% kosher salt right by my stove for seasonings. A pinch or two of the mix does the trick for most things.

Watch the chard as it broils. You want it mostly wilted with a little char, not a pan full of ashes! The charred chard retains some texture and can be strongly flavored. It needs a touch sweetness.

I didn’t have golden raisins on hand. I used grape tomatoes on the side for sweet balance and was very happy with it. I’ll be making this again when I pick up some raisins.

The recipe suggests adding chickpeas and crumbled feta to make a vegetating main dish. I expect substituting a mildly salty vegan cheese world work, too.
 

Meatless Monday Night

Pure luck: Found a good sounding salad recipe and had the main ingredients oh hand – fennel and red chard. A little thinking and the richness of baked feta balanced with the mild tang of a Cara Cara orange sounded like the rest of a meal.
Confession: Only dinner was meatless. It’s a start.

Wilted chard, fennel, baked feta, Cara Cara orange for Meatless Monday.

Wilted Chard and Shaved Fennel Salad
 Ingredients
1 lb. rainbow chard
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 cup thinly sliced fennel bulb
¼ cup water
¼ cup chopped pistachios
2 Tbsp fennel fronds
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
¼ tsp black pepper
1/8 tsp kosher salt
Method
Coarsely chop chard leaves; thinly slice stems to equal 1 cup. (Reserve remaining stems for another use.)
Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add chard stems and fennel and cook, stirring often until starting to soften – about 3 minutes.Add chard leaves and ¼ cup water, cover until just starting to wilt – about a minute and a half. Drain. Toss with apple cider vinegar and salt and pepper.
Divide into four servings. Top each evenly with the chopped pistachios and fennel fronds.

Baked Feta
Ingredients
Block feta to allow 4 oz. per person
Olive oil
Method
Heat oven to 400º
Cut feta into individual servings. Brush all sides with olive oil.
Put feta on a foil-covered baking sheet and cook for 20 minutes. Turn on broiler and put feta under it for 2 – 3 minutes until it gets a little color. Carefully transfer to plates and garnish with a fennel frond or two. Serve warm.

Pizza and Salad for Breakfast or for Supper

Savory, rich, sweet, tart and a hint of bitter make an individual breakfast pizza or supper.

You can take a recipe for four and reduce it to a just-right serving for one or two. You can also play with it and have a good time. The original recipe called for refrigerated whole wheat pizza dough. I substituted a package of two ready-made bake-it-yourself crusts. I actually tried two different crusts on two different mornings – first, a  thin crust and, the second time with a thicker crust.  Both were good. When I followed the cooking directions for the thin crust, the time needed for the baked egg n the recipe made the crust more like a crispy cracker. Good, but not what I had expected. When I used the thicker crust, I baked it for three minutes, turned it over on my sheet pan, added the toppings and baked it 8 minutes to set the egg white and leave the yolk soft the way I like it! The recipe used lemon and oil dressed arugula as a garnish.  I like arugula, so I made it a side salad instead of a garnish by adding a few sliced grape tomatoes and a sprinkle of grated parmesan.  Next time I make this, I’ll sprinkle some crisp crumbled bacon or pancetta on top. Play with your food and make it yours!  Below is the original recipe for four servings from Cooking Light Magazine. It divides in to two or one serving easily.

Mini Breakfast Pizzas
Ingredients
12 oz. whole wheat pizza dough
1 cup part-skim ricotta cheese
1-1/4 tsp lemon zest
1/4 tsp kosher salt, divided
1/4 tsp ground pepper, divided
4 large eggs
2 tsp extra virgin olive oil
2 tsp fresh lemon juice
4 cups packed baby arugula

Method
Let dough stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Divide dough into 4 pieces.
Place a pizza stone or large baking sheet in oven; preheat to 450º with stone or baking sheet in place as oven heats.
On a lightly floured surface, roll each piece of dough into a 7-inch circle. pierce liberally with a fork.
Arrange two dough circles on the hot pizza stone or sheet pan and bake for 3 minutes. Remove from oven and flip so cooked side is up. Repeat with remaining two dough circles. Depending on the size of your stone or pan and your oven, you may need to baked two pizzas at a time instead of all four at once.
Stir together ricotta cheese and lemon zest. Divide ricotta evenly among cooked sides of dough circles, sprinkle evenly with 1/8 tsp salt and 1/8 tsp pepper. (I question 1/8 tsp seasoning on 4 pizzas and used a light pinch of salt and pepper on each one after adding the egg as instructed below.) Top each circle with 1 egg and 1 Tbsp parmesan. Bake at 450º until whites are set and yolk is still a little runny.
While pizzas bake, Whisk together oil, juice, and remaining salt and pepper I (or to taste as I did!). Toss arugula in dressing.
Remove pizzas from oven, plate and top with 1 cup dressed arugula.

Who’d a Thunk It… Cauliflower = Seafood?

Vegetarian ceviche that’s really good!

It’s always fun to run across a recipe that my vegetarian daughter might like. I think this one qualifies.  It is a vegetarian ceviche made with cauliflower instead of sea food.  I took it to a Thanksgiving dinner as an appetizer. A couple of people asked me what kind of seafood was in it. I had to convince them that it was all vegetables!

Cauliflower Ceviche

Thanks to Beatriz Barranco, El Paso, TX and Taste of Home Magazine, November 2017

Ingredients
1 medium head cauliflower, finely chopped
1 cup catsup
1 cup orange juice
3 medium tomatoes chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
½ cup minced fresh cilantro
½ Tsp each salt and pepper
3 medium avocados, peeled and cubed
Lemon wedges, tortilla chips, hot pepper sauce, optional

Method
In a large skillet, bring 1 cup water to a boil. Add cauliflower; cook uncovered until crisp-tender – 5 to 8 minutes.  Drain, spread out and blot pat dry.  While cauliflower is cooking, mix together catsup and orange juice.

In a bowl, combine cauliflower with tomatoes and onion.  Add catsup and orange juice mixture, cilantro, salt and pepper, toss to mix well.  Refrigerate at least one hour or overnight.

Before serving, gently stir in avocado cubes. Serve with tortilla chips, lemon wedges and optional hot pepper sauce.

Note:  I had to mess with it a little, of course. I prefer lime juice and lime wedges over lemon for this dish.  I found it to be a little too sweet for my taste, so I added the juice of a lime when I added the avocado cubes. It might be good to compare the sugar in various brands of catsup and use the one with the lowest sugar to start out with.

I had leftovers, and I had to experiment a little more.  I picked up a handful of shrimp, boiled, peeled and chopped them and added them to the “ceviche.”  I honestly couldn’t tell they added anything to the recipe.  It stands alone with the cauliflower and I’ll be making it again soon.

Even in the Desert, You Can Get a Craving for Seafood

When you live about 1,000 miles from the coast, seafood is something exotic.  We know about shrimp and sometimes see live lobsters can be found in a tank at the grocery store.  We get salt cod and a few varieties of frozen “fresh” fish are good, but pretty mundane.  Now that we have a Whole Foods market, we see different varieties of seafood that I hope to learn how to cook someday. In the meantime, I fall back on the tried and true.  I do grill the occasional swordfish steak and I love to sear ahi tuna with a crust of crushed wasabi peas when I’m feeling exotic. I’m more likely to do a soup or stew or to try a version of baked cod.  I found a new baked cod recipe in an article on sheet pan suppers and, of course I had to try it and am happy to share it.  It was a recipe for four servings that I was able to reduce to one serving successfully in keeping with my new search for how to make one or two serving meals.  I’m including the full recipe below, but have added a couple of notes about my experience

Sheet pan Provençal Cod, Potatoes and String Beans fulfill a desert craving for seafood!

Provençal Cod, Potatoes and String Beans
Ingredients:
1 lb. Yukon Gold potatoes, thinly sliced
¼ cup plus 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 tsp herbes de Provence, Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
8 oz yellow wax beans and/or green beans, trimmed
2 small tomatoes, diced
1/3 cup Kalamata olives, roughly chopped
2Tbsp fresh lemon juice
4 6-oz cod fillets (1 to ½ inch thick)
Chopped fresh parsley for topping
Method:
Put a rimmed baking sheet in the upper third of an oven and preheat to 475°. Combine potatoes, 2 Tbsp olive oil and ½ tsp herbes de Provence in a large bowl; season generously with salt and pepper.  In a separate bowl, combine the beans, 1 Tbsp oilive oil and the remaining ½ tsp herbes de Provence; season generously with salt and pepper.

Remove the hot baking sheet from the oven; add the potatoes in a single layer on one side of the pan and the beans on the other side.  Roast until the potatoes and browned and the beans are tender – about 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, combine the tomatoes, olives, remaining 2 Tbsp olive oil, the lemon juice. ½ tsp salt and pinch of pepper in a small bowl; set aside. Season the cod all over with salt.

Remove the baking sheet from the oven. If potatoes and beans are done, remove and keep warm. If not done, push to their sides leaving a space in the middle.  Place the cod in the middle of the pan and top with half of the tomato mixture. Roast until the cod is opaque – 10-12 minutes. Sprinkle the potatoes with parsley. Serve with the remaining tomato mixture.

Notes: In my oven, the beans and potatoes were done at 20 minutes.  I left them on the the cod and the beans were a bit overdone by the time the cods was done. Check them while the cod is cooking, to be safe.

I could only find a long filet of cod with a narrow end. I folded the narrow end under the thick end sandwiching some of the olive and tomato mix in between.  It worked fine and was colorful and tasty.

This recipe reduced easily to one serving with a single cod filet and smaller portions of beans and potatoes.  I did the full recipe of the olive, tomato lemon mix and enjoyed what didn’t fit on the cod right out of the bowl with a spoon!

 

 

Paring Down Can Foster Indulgence, so Play with Your Food!

Some of us subscribe to cooking and recipe sites on the web.  Interesting things appear that tantalize the eye and the appetite.  Some arouse curiosity and other demand to be made. All those happened when I ran across Chile-Lime Clams with Tomatoes and Grilled Bread.  My curiosity was peaked by the inclusion of chick peas (garbanzo beans) in the recipe.  I’m most familiar with chickpeas as hummus and don’t have much experience with them as whole beans.  What the heck, give it a try!  And this recipe for four servings appeared easy to reduce per my goals in this New Season of reduced quantities. It also was flexible enough to allow for loose measuring of ingredients. For instance, it called for 24 clams. Six clams per serving? Pikers!  I ordered 12 clams to make one serving. I love clams and had no guilt over this indulgence. When cooking for one, or som times two, indulge and enjoy! I used the recipe below as a guideline for this dish.  I played with parts of it, hence inclusion in the Play with Your Food Category.

Chile-Lime Clams with Tomatoes. As good as it was hoped it would be! A keeper.

The original recipe suggested cooking in a cast iron pan on a grill outside. Think this over… acid foods (including tomatoes)  cooked in cast iron can acquire a metallic taste and cause the pans to lose their carefully built up seasoned finish. I read that acidic foods cooked in cast iron for no more than 15 minutes will not acquire a metallic taste, nor will the harm the finish.  Not worth the risk on my older than I am cast iron hand-me-downs from early in the last century!

It has been unseasonably hot so far this spring and summer.  I’m convinced hot air from the Capitol fanned by Tweet kindling is the cause, but that’s a different rant. I chose to cook on the stovetop in an anodized aluminum pan that has a non-teflon, dishwasher safe non-stick finish.  I had to forgo grilled toast, but was satisfied with torn chunks of bread with a schemear of butter for sopping up the pan sauce with the meal. This photo is of the pan on the stovetop.  I knew a dozen clams in my serving bowl, would be too crowded for a good picture.  Indulge me and imagine chopped cilantro sprinkled on top.

CHILE-LIME CLAMS WITH TOMATOES AND GRILLED BREAD

4 servings

INGREDIENTS

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into pieces, divided

2 large shallots, chopped

4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced

1 tablespoon tomato paste

1 cup beer

1 cup cherry tomatoes

1 (15.5-ounce) can chickpeas, rinsed

2 tablespoons (or more) sambal oelek

24 littleneck clams, scrubbed

1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

4 thick slices country-style bread

2 tablespoons olive oil

Kosher salt

1/2 cup cilantro leaves with tender stems

Lime wedges (for serving)

METHOD

Prepare a grill for medium, indirect heat (for a gas grill, leave one or two burners off; for a charcoal grill, bank coals on one side of grill). Place a large cast-iron skillet on grill over direct heat (move it around to cooler part of grill as you cook if needed) and melt 4 Tbsp. butter in skillet. Add shallots and garlic and cook, stirring often, until soft, about 4 minutes. Add tomato paste and cook, stirring often, until paste darkens to a rich brick-red color, about 1 minute. Add beer and tomatoes. Bring to a boil and cook until beer is reduced nearly by half and no longer smells boozy, about 4 minutes. Stir in chickpeas and sambal oelek, then add clams. Cover (if you don’t have a lid that fits, use a sheet of foil) and cook, stirring occasionally, until clams have opened; this could take from 5–10 minutes depending on size of clams and the heat level. Remove from heat; discard any clams that don’t open. Stir in lime juice and remaining 2 Tbsp. butter.

While the clams are cooking on the grill, drizzle bread with oil and season lightly with salt. Grill until golden brown and crisp, about 2 minutes per side.

Transfer toast to plates and spoon clam mixture over; top with cilantro. Serve with lime wedges for squeezing over.

 

 

 

Tomato Salad with Crispy Potatoes and Creamy Feta

It took some time to prep and cook, but it so worth the effort. This plate is two servings. I slipped a small steak on my plate to go with it.

My Master Gardener good neighbor brought me a bag of grape tomatoes and green tomatoes that will ripen in a few days.  Coincidentally, I had been looking at this tomato salad in the new issue of Sunset Magazine. Of course I had to give it a try. Red, green and yellow tomatoes were cut in slices, wedges and halves to make it interesting.  Some slivers of red onion gave it a gentle bite and oven roasted, smashed baby potatoes set it off well.  Those potatoes are destined to be a house favorite.  You can see a little of the base of creamy feta made by blending feta with buttermilk to get the desired creamy consistency.  A touch of sumac was just the right touch.

TOMATO SALAD WITH CRISPY POTATOES AND CREAMY FETA

 Serves 4 – 6;

Prep and cook 1-1/2 hours and worth it!

 Crispy Potatoes

Ingredients

1 lb. baby potatoes

About ½ tsp salt

About 1’2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Method

Preheat oven to 425°. Scrub and dry potatoes and heap on a rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle with ½ tsp. salt and pour on ½ cup olive oil. Turn to coat well and spread in an even layer and roast until crisp – 25-30 minutes. Turn every 10 minutes or so to be sure they are evenly coated with oil.

Remove potatoes from oven and test with a fork, when soft enough to pierce, press with a potato masher to flatten them.  If needed season lightly with salt and drizzle with more oil, if needed. Return to oven and roast until browned and very crisp – another 20–25 minutes, turning over halfway through. Set aside to cool.

Creamy Feta

Ingredients

7 oz. feta, preferably sheep’s milk, crumbled to yield about 11/2 cups

1 to 4 Tbsp well-shaken 2% buttermilk

11/2 tsp. sumac (available at middle eastern groceries)

fine sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Method

While potatoes roast, make the feta sauce. In a food processor, blend feta a few seconds to break it down. With blade spinning, slowly add buttermilk to make the sauce thick and smooth as crème fraiche. Scrape sides and bottom of processor with a rubber spatula if necessary and blend just until smooth. Blend in sumac. Add salt and pepper to taste.

To Serve:

1/1/4 heirloom tomatoes cut into wedges and/or thick slices.

2 Tbsp thinly sliced red onion

1 Tbsp sherry vinegar

Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1Tbsp flat-leaf parsley leaves and chervil leaves

¼ cup small to medium basil leaves

Extra-virgin olive oil

Assemble salad: In a large bowl, toss tomato pieces, red onion, red onion and crispy potatoes (include any oil left in pan) with vinegar.  Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Spread feta sauce on a large serving platter and arrange tomato and potato mixture on top. Shingle in herbs and finish with a drizzle of oil.

Carrot and Radish Salad Ramped Up

I’ve been playing with my food again. I recommend that everyone try it.  It can be satisfying on many levels.  This time I began with a recipe I’ll share below, after I tell you what I did.

The recipe for a Carrot and Radish Salad read well and the accompanying photo was attractive. The recipe used orange carrots and red radishes and oil-packed canned tuna. As a rule, I’m not a fan of canned tuna, especially in soup-based casseroles or pasta salads with mayo and pickles.  The one embarrassing exception is I love the scroodle tuna salad at Souper Salads. I haven’t figured out what is in it that makes it so good, but it really is tasty.

I decided to up the ante for last night’s salad with rainbow carrots and Easter egg radishes and tuna steaks.  My playing with it made a very bright and colorful salad that was a great accompaniment to the seared tuna.  The recipe’s vinaigrette was complimentary to both the vegetables and the tuna. I served chunks of baguette with butter on the side because everyone in this household loves a rare treat of white bread and butter.

NOTE: I used a handheld mandoline to slice the vegetables.  Even the thinnest slice was a bit thick for the carrots. Next time, I’ll just use the vegetable peeler on the carrots to make them a little more delicate.

Carrot and Radish Salad with Seared Tuna – what happens with you play with your food.

Carrot and Radish Salad

 INGREDIENTS

1 bunch radishes (about 1/2 pound)

2–3 medium carrots (about 1/2 pound)

2 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt, divided

2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons white wine or Champagne vinegar

3/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 1/2 tablespoons capers

4 ounces drained oil-packed canned flaked tuna (about 3/4 cup)

2 tablespoons parsley leaves

MEDTHOD

Slice radishes into very thin rounds. Using a vegetable peeler, peel carrots lengthwise into long, thin slices. Combine 2 tsp. salt and 3 cups ice water in a medium bowl and soak radishes and carrots for 10 minutes. Drain and pat dry.

Meanwhile, whisk lemon juice, vinegar, mustard, pepper, and remaining 1/4 tsp. salt in a small bowl until combined. Whisk in oil in a slow stream.

Toss radishes, carrots, and capers in a large bowl with just enough vinaigrette to coat.

Divide among 4 plates and top with tuna and parsley; drizzle with remaining vinaigrette and top with a few grinds of black pepper.

Note:  I used rainbow carrots and Easter egg radishes, seared tuna and a tiny dab of wasabi paste on each chunk of tuna. Otherwise, I followed the recipe.  The vinaigrette is very nice.