Indecision Sparks Creativity

Breakfast can be a challenging meal.  Traditional fare is good, but one can get in a rut. Waking with a craving complicates the whole thing – what to do? A BLT sounded good, but so did  simple toast and jammy eggs with bacon. Time to play with my food and get the best of both, with a twist, of course.

Open-face BLT and Jammy Eggs breakfast.

No recipe, just taking what was on hand and playing with it as described below.

Open Face BLT With Jammy Eggs
Ingredients
2 slices 21-grain toast
2 slices sharp cheddar cheese
a big handful of curly endive lettuce torn from the stem
a generous handful of sliced grape tomatoes
3 slices of ready-to-eat bacon, crisped in the microwave for 30 seconds
a generous schmear of mayo
scant Tbsp olive oil
two eggs
light splash of white vinegar
light sprinkle of kosher salt and black pepper

Method
Bring enough water in a small pan to a boil; gently lower two eggs into water and simmer for EXACTLY seven minutes. Remove eggs with a slotted spoon and place in an ice bath for two and a half minutes, remove from ice water and set aside.
Heat olive oil in a small skillet, add sliced tomatoes and sauté until soft and getting a little char. Add endive and let wilt, you might need to add a Tbsp of water (use twice as much as you think you need because is loses volume when cooked). Stir in a light splash of white vinegar and a very little pinch of salt.
Toast bread, schmear with mayo and top each with a cheese slice while toast is hot. Add cooked tomatoes and endive. Halve bacon slices and put three pieces on top of tomatoes and endive. Peel jammy eggs (start on the big end where the bubble is), place on sandwich and slice in half. Sprinkle eggs with a pinch of salt and pepper.

The Whyfors (Whyfor did I do that?)
Think about the flavors of the ingredients and what you can do with them. Multigrain toast, mayo and sharp cheddar is a great foundation for any sandwich, open-face or closed. Traditional bacon, lettuce and tomato are a wonderful filling. Cooking sliced grape tomatoes a little enhances the sugar in them and kicks them up a couple of notches. Curly endive is tantalizingly bitter. Cooking it reduces its bitter bite and a little white vinegar takes out a little more of the bitter while emphasizing the sweetness of the tomatoes. The eggs feature cooked whites and a thickened “jammy” yolk that gives the whole sandwich wonderfully rich mouthfeel and flavor.

Modesty forbids my raving (too much) about this creation. Odds are it will be breakfast again this morning and a regular on the morning menu until the next idea comes along.

After making the earlier post, I had to rush out the the kitchen an play with this idea more for this morning’s breakfast. I did a few things differently. I put the sliced grape tomatoes in a heated dry pan and let them yield some juice and take on a little char. Then I added a Tbsp of water and cooked it off to steam the tomatoes and cook them faster.  When they were tender, I added the endive. I added twice as much as I did yesterday and think it would be good to add even more.  I added 2 Tbsp water with the greens and cooked it off to steam-wilt them and get a little darker.  When the water was cooked off, I added it and stirred the tomatoes and endive until the vinegar had mostly evaporated.  Cooking the vegetables both ways tasted about the same because of the vinegar. The advantage of the dry pan and water is that there was no spatter mess as there was with olive oil.  I plated one open-face BLT and one with a jammy egg. The were equally good, but I do have a weakness for jammy eggs any number of ways.

  

As I enjoyed this breakfast, I thought about how it might be with English muffin, Swiss cheese, a poached egg and hollandaise sauce. Watch this space and see what happens.

 

Frittata for One

Broccoli and Feta Frittata with a stack of Dave’s Killer 21-grain Bread Toast and a Schmear of Butter.

Here we go again! I did some browsing and found a good-sounding frittata that called for 8 eggs.  That’s a lot for one guy at breakfast! Here’s a version using most of the ingredients called for and to make recipe for cooking without a recipe for a great breakfast for one.  With a side of fruit, it could easily become a breakfast for two. Do some elementary arithmetic and expand it for more if you want to impress folks.

Broccoli and Feta Frittata for One
Equipment
8-inch ovenproof sauté pan
Small bowl
Small whisk or fork
Kitchen knife
Ingredients
Two or three eggs
1 Tbsp chopped onion
1/2 – 3/4 cup small broccoli florets
2 Tbsp crumbled feta cheese
1 pat butter
Optional – a sprinkle or two of chile flakes to taste
Method
Heat broiler in oven with a rack about 4 inches below the flame.
Melt butter in sauté pan on stovetop. Add onion and cook on medium temp for 3-4 minutes until soft. Add broccoli and cook about 6 minutes. The broccoli will turn a beautiful bright green and be tender but still have a little “tooth” to it. You can speed this up by adding a table spoon of water to the pan at a time and letting it steam and evaporate to help soften the onion and broccoli.

While the onion and broccoli cook, beat the eggs until whites and yolks are well blended and stir in chile flakes and about 2/3 of the crumbled feta.

Pour egg mixture over the broccoli and onion and stir to distribute broccoli and feta in the eggs. Let cook a couple of minutes to set the bottom of the eggs. Sprinkle remaining feta over the top. Transfer the pan to the oven and cook for 5 minutes, check frequently to see that the eggs have set and the sprinkled feta is lightly browned.

Remove from oven, remembering the pan handle is very hot! Plate and enjoy.

Non-paid testimonialI am a great fan of Dave’s Killer Bread 21-grain loaf. Great flavor and usually the only bread in my house. Read the package for the story behind it and the good things it makes happens for Dave’s employees. If you like it, buy two loaves in a bag at the big warehouse stores and save considerably over the price of one loaf at the chain grocery stores.

Dave’s Killer Bread

Note
I’ve been looking at a lot of “cooking for one” cookbooks and the all see to being with a chapter on how to stock a pantry and what kitchen gear one needs. I began this post with a list of equipment because of that influence. Surely your kitchen looks as much like the the kitchen store at the mall as mine and you don’t need a list of equipment. But, just in case, it is here this time.

Pizza and Salad for Breakfast or for Supper

Savory, rich, sweet, tart and a hint of bitter make an individual breakfast pizza or supper.

You can take a recipe for four and reduce it to a just-right serving for one or two. You can also play with it and have a good time. The original recipe called for refrigerated whole wheat pizza dough. I substituted a package of two ready-made bake-it-yourself crusts. I actually tried two different crusts on two different mornings – first, a  thin crust and, the second time with a thicker crust.  Both were good. When I followed the cooking directions for the thin crust, the time needed for the baked egg n the recipe made the crust more like a crispy cracker. Good, but not what I had expected. When I used the thicker crust, I baked it for three minutes, turned it over on my sheet pan, added the toppings and baked it 8 minutes to set the egg white and leave the yolk soft the way I like it! The recipe used lemon and oil dressed arugula as a garnish.  I like arugula, so I made it a side salad instead of a garnish by adding a few sliced grape tomatoes and a sprinkle of grated parmesan.  Next time I make this, I’ll sprinkle some crisp crumbled bacon or pancetta on top. Play with your food and make it yours!  Below is the original recipe for four servings from Cooking Light Magazine. It divides in to two or one serving easily.

Mini Breakfast Pizzas
Ingredients
12 oz. whole wheat pizza dough
1 cup part-skim ricotta cheese
1-1/4 tsp lemon zest
1/4 tsp kosher salt, divided
1/4 tsp ground pepper, divided
4 large eggs
2 tsp extra virgin olive oil
2 tsp fresh lemon juice
4 cups packed baby arugula

Method
Let dough stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Divide dough into 4 pieces.
Place a pizza stone or large baking sheet in oven; preheat to 450º with stone or baking sheet in place as oven heats.
On a lightly floured surface, roll each piece of dough into a 7-inch circle. pierce liberally with a fork.
Arrange two dough circles on the hot pizza stone or sheet pan and bake for 3 minutes. Remove from oven and flip so cooked side is up. Repeat with remaining two dough circles. Depending on the size of your stone or pan and your oven, you may need to baked two pizzas at a time instead of all four at once.
Stir together ricotta cheese and lemon zest. Divide ricotta evenly among cooked sides of dough circles, sprinkle evenly with 1/8 tsp salt and 1/8 tsp pepper. (I question 1/8 tsp seasoning on 4 pizzas and used a light pinch of salt and pepper on each one after adding the egg as instructed below.) Top each circle with 1 egg and 1 Tbsp parmesan. Bake at 450º until whites are set and yolk is still a little runny.
While pizzas bake, Whisk together oil, juice, and remaining salt and pepper I (or to taste as I did!). Toss arugula in dressing.
Remove pizzas from oven, plate and top with 1 cup dressed arugula.

Back at a New Season

It has been a while since I’ve posted.  That’s because it has been a while since I’ve cooked anything exciting that would work under the New Season goal of recipes for one or two. Browsing through the cookbooks on Amazon, one day, I found several interesting one’s that did two things: 1 – inspire me to try some new adventures in cooking, and 2 – order a few new cookbooks.  I tempered that cookbook vice by ordering a couple of e-books and others I bought using the re-sellers available through Amazon at greatly reduced prices plus shipping. As I explore the books and my experiences with the recipes for one or two they hold, I’ll share info about the cookbooks.

One I’m enjoying is Guy Gourmet written by Adina Steinman dnd Paul Kita with the editors of Men’s Health magazine.  Many of the recipes are for two, but those that serve four can easily be reduced to two servings. By using a reseller, I got a $25 dollar cookbook for $5.99 plus $3.99 shipping for a good as new hard cover book. (A couple of years ago, a friend showed me a new cookbook she bought for $30.00. I liked it and found it on an Amazon re-eller for $2.00 plus shipping. I’m still gloating over that purchase!)

This morning, I tried the Guy Gourmet Stuffed French Toast.  As a rule, I’n not that big a fan of French toast, but it read well and I could reduce the recipe from two servings to one. When I am sharing their recipe, I will provide my interpretation of the original so I hopefully won’t be sued!

Stuffed French Toast Inspired by  Guy Gourmet  – makes two sandwiches
Ingredients
4 slices day-old or stale thick bread (I used a bolillo I left on the counter a couple of days and just sliced it in half to make one sandwich.  I also use single bolillos to make garlic bread so I won’t eat a whole loaf of French bread by myself.
4 eggs
2 Tbsp milk
1 tsp sugar or maple syrup
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1 Tbsp butter
Powdered sugar for sprinkling on top if desired
A filling you like – I used sliced apples and bacon. Other possibilities might include a nut spread and banana slices or cream cheese and berries. Be creative.

Method
Beat eggs, milk and sugar or syrup and cinnamon together in a bowl and pour into a baking dish big enough to hold two of the slices of bread
Place topping on two slices of bread and top with the other two slices. Place stacks in batter for two minutes, turning after one minutes so both sides of the bread can absorb and be coated by the batter.
‘Melt the butter in a medium non-stick skillet over medium high heat. Places th sandwiches in the pan and cook until golden brown. Flip the sandwiches so both sides are golden. Serve with a sprinkling of powdered sugar and more of the fruit you used for stuffing the French Toast.

 

Bacon and Apple Stuffed French Toast sans powered sugar sprinkle. More savory than sweet that way!

Scavenger Shakshouka

Shakshouka, a tomato based stew topped with eggs, has been trendy for awhile as breakfast,a brunch or a light supper. I’ve made and posted traditional shakshouka, green shakshouka and even a leftover corn bread version my daughter named Corn Shouka and enjoyed them all. I was surprised this month when one of my food magazines had multiple shakshouka recipes including one in an advertisement for a diet program’s new marketing plan. There were multiple spelling including the magazine’s Shakshuka version. All that got me shukaed up, so you might find different spellings scattered through here.  Yes, it is a terrible pun; just deal with it!
I decided to make shakshuka for breakfast, regardless of the spelling. The challenge was that most published recipes make a lot, come calling for a dozen eggs!  These days, I’m cooking for one. Reading some of the recipes, I got a feel for ingredients and decided to check out the fridge and pantry to see what I might scavenge for an impromptu shakshouka. You know how I enjoy playing with my food!

Shakshouka just out of the often. Drat!!! one egg yolk broke. Not bad, though, for scavenged ingredients!

Scavenger Shashouka

Ingredients found on hand:
Diced canned tomatoes left over from another project
Onion
Garlic
Bell pepper
One foil packet (two tablespoons) tomato paste What a great convenience discovery they are! Six packets in a box so you don’t have to throw away most of a can of tomato paste.
Jarred red chile salsa (Chimayo brand is amazing!)
Greens (I happend to have some red Swiss chard)
Eggs
Feta cheese
Olive oil
My stove top blend of 60% kosher salt and 40% ground black pepper

Method
NOTE: Measurements included in the methods are eye-balled estimates. Trust your experience and instincts and play with that food! Makes two servings.

Heat up the broiler in your oven.
Add a splash (1 or 2 Tbsp) olive oil to an 8-inch non-stick sauté pan and heat until it begins to shimmer. Use a second-press inexpensive olive oil for this, save your EVOO for salad dressing or for drizzling over the shakshouka at serving.
Add chopped onions and bell pepper, about a Tbsp or two of each, and cook until tinder.  Lower heat if needed to keep from burning the onion.
Add a minced garlic clove or two and let them soften, but not turn golden, stir in the packet of tomato paste, but don’t include the foil. When paste is soften and blended in, add a cup of so of drained diced tomatoes. My pan was filled to about half an inch short of the top. Stir in the salsa (as much for Chile heat as you think you can take) onion, bell pepper and garlic and let it all simmer until reduced and not soggy wet. Add chopped greens to the pan, stir into the mix as the greens wilt and be come tender.
Make two wells in the tomato mix and crack an egg into each. When eggs begin to set, transfer pan to the oven under the broiler. Check it frequently and remove the pan when the egg whites are just set. The yolks should be just set.
Remove pan from the oven and sprinkle crumbled feta cheese on the tomato mix an eggs. Let it set up a couple of minutes and the cheese soften a little, salt and pepper mix to taste, then plate and enjoy.

Half an 8-inch plan and a side of toast was just right for breakfast. The good news is I get to have the second half today!

Bulletin: Left overs were more flavorful than the first time around!  I may have to experiment making it a day ahead.

Sweet Potato Hash Browned Waffle

You can do many more things with sweet potatoes than serve them baked with syrup and marshmallows once a year. And you can tell yourself that sweet potato fries are better for you than French fried potatoes. I suspect you have not tried Sweet Potato Hash Browed Waffles!  I saw a recipe and drooled at the photo so I had to try it.  The recipe is gluten free, and it is posted below as such.  I found that the batter of rice flower, coconut oil and egg did not hold the sweet potatoes together well in my Belgian waffle maker. I used the gluten free items because of a friend’s dietary needs. I’ll make the recipe with regular flour for myself next time. I’ll also use my panini press to cook the sweet potato has because on only have a Belgian waffle maker.

Open-face sweet potato hash brown waffle topped with ham and a Brussels sprout slaw and dried cranberries make an exotic and delicious breakfast!

Ingredients

Waffles

2 medium-size sweet potatoes (about 20 oz.), peeled and julienned

1 cup thinly sliced yellow onion

3 Tbsp brown rice flour

1 Tbsp melted coconut oil plus more for greasing the waffle iron

Slaw

3 Tbsp olive oil

2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar

2 tsp Dijon mustard

1 tsp pure maple syrup

8 ounces Brussels sprouts, shaved

1/3 cup dried cranberries

8 ounces nitrate-free reduced-sodium thinly sliced ham

Method

1 Preheat a waffle iron to high. (I recommend a regular waffle iron rather than a Belgian waffle iron.) Combine the grated sweet potato, onion slices, 1 Tablespoon coconut oil and 1/2 teaspoon of salt in a medium bowl.  Grease the waffle iron with coconut oil and place 1-1/2 cuts of the sweet potato mixture in the center of the waffle iron, spread the mixture to create a 6-inch square.  Close the waffle iron and cook until browned and tender – about 13 minutes. Remove the waffled sweet potato hash and remove and repeat the procedure until four waffles have been made.

2. Whisk together the oil, vinegar, mustard, maple syrup and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt in a medium bowl.  Add the shaved Brussels sprouts and let stand until the sprouts are tender – about 10 minutes.  Fold in the cranberries.

3. Put one waffle on each of 4 plates.  Top each with 2 ounces of ham slices and about 2/3 cup Brussels slaw.

Note: This slaw is especially flavorful and would be good as a side or topper for most anything.

Cheesy Grits with Scallions and Jammy Eggs

Green Chili cheese grits topped with a poached egg have long been a favorite cool weather breakfast, but, now there’s a new game in town!  In the April issue of Bon Appétit, I ran across a technique for Jammy Soft Boiled Eggs served on cheesy grits that I just had to try. No green chili in the grits, but a sprinkling of sautéd scallions and thin-sliced jalapeño saved the day.  I think the jammy eggs rank right up there with poached eggs for silky delicious yolks just a bit more firm than poached egg yolks.

Cheesy grits topped by jammy eggs and crisp scallions and jalapeño.

If you don’t know that the ratio of grits to water is 1 to 4, you must be a Yankee.*  Slowly pour 1/4 cup grits into 2 cups gently boiling lightly salted water and stir. As grits begin to thicken, reduce temperature and stir occasionally until grits are tender.  You might need to add more liquid near the end of cooking.  At this stage, I thin it with milk and stir in a tablespoon or so of butter.  I don’t use = quick cooking or instant grits, I use the real thing that takes about 25 minutes to cook.  It is well worth it to get luscious, smooth and rich flavor.  While the grits cook, slice scallions an jalapeño in thin strips. Use an entire bunch of scallions, green and white parts, and two stemmed and seeded chilis, sautéd crisp, the drained on paper towels.

To make the jammy eggs, bring a large saucepan of water deep enough to cover eggs to a boil over medium-high. A 2-quart pan should hold 6-8 eggs. Carefully lower eggs into water using a slotted spoon.  Cook for EXACTLY 6-1/2 have minutes, then transfer the eggs to a ice bath and chill until the eggs are slightly warm – about 2 minutes.  The ice baths stops the cooking and makes the eggs easier to peel. Remove the eggs from the ice bath, peel and slice them.  The yolk will be jammy and warm.

Dish up the grits, top with slice eggs and sprinkle with crisp scallions and jalapeño.

These eggs are so good that I’m searching for things I can serve under them.

Corn Shucka Invented When I Played with My Food

Corn Shucka Invented

Dicussion this morning with my daughters this morning about making shakshouka for dinner this evening. The question was “red or green’. We’re in Colorado, but the discussion sounded like we were in Santa Fe.
It was an interesting morning for food discussion. We were invited to a pot luck supper last night. Mande made two kinds of cornbread, one recipe plain, one recipe with green chile. There was a debate about sugar in the cornbread. The girls have some Yankee notions about sugar in cornbread and white bread stuffing, thanks the “other” side of the family.
I decided to do a Play With Your Food demo for breakfast with distinctly Southern and Tex-Mex overtones.
It started with left over cornbread of both types and toasted thin slices of a baguette, a little chopped onion and celery, sweated in butter, some vegetable broth and chopped long green chile left over from yesterday’s cornbread prep.
I mixed it all together in a bowl and transferred it to a baking dish. I sunk six wells into the batter and popped it into the oven for about 20 minutes. The wells were inspired by thoughts of shakshouka which a vegetable stove top casserole in which eggs are cooked.
After 20 minutes my green chile cornbread stuffing was set and hot. I broke an egg into the wells and returned the dish to the oven with the goal of setting the egg whites while leaving the yolks soft and runny. I will admit I let the yolks overcook and they were not runny.
We each had two helpings of eggs in the green chile cornbread stuffing and pronounced it good. Daughter Emily came up with calling this Corn Shucka based on the eggs nestled in the corn bread.
Cooking without a recipe and Playing With Your Food produces good results.

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Cornbread stuffing becomes Corn Shucka.

 

 

When you don’t know what else to do, play with your food.

Breakfast is always a challenge.  It seems to be a conflict between healthy and sweet or savory not so healthy. Who has time to plan as far ahead as the next day’s breakfast anyway? So, here it is Sunday morning.  An inventory of the kitchen: one medium potato, a couple of onions, eggs, left-over grated cheese from earlier in the week and a little bit of smoked pork belly that really should be used soon. There were a few slices of 21-grain bread and, hiding in the refrigerator, a jar with about two tablespoons of Seville Orange Marmalade.

Seeing the marmalade made me imagine flamenco guitar music. And then the magic words Spanish tortilla popped into my head. A Spanish tortilla works  for breakfast and as one of a table of tapas or small plates at happy hour. The good thing is the tortilla is basically eggs and potatoes with some imagination tossed in. Since I didn’t have Spanish chorizo, a hard sausage, I decided to use my pork belly. I diced the pork belly into cubes about 1/4 inch square, then I used my hand-held mandoline to slice the potato and paper thin rings of onion. An an afterthought, I grated some extra sharp cheddar, in case there wasn’t enough fat going into the tortilla from the pork belly!

I warmed the pork belly in a wide shallow sauté pan, spread it evenly and added a layer of onion slices separated into rings over the pork.  Next was a layer of potato slices.  I let the onions and potatoes soften for a few moments, then poured two beaten eggs and a splash of boxed egg product over everything. A few shakes and swirls got the egg mix down around the potato and onion slices.  After the eggs began to set around the edges, I put the pan in a 375º oven for about 10 minutes.  I check that the eggs were set throughout, then place a plate over the pan and flipped the tortilla out onto the plate.  I slipped it back into the pan, bottom side up, sprinkled it with a little cheddar cheese and popped it back into the oven to  melt. I turned the oven off while this happened and made toast.

My Spanish tortilla inspired breakfast was a  hit.  My good neighbors gave us a wonderful homemade salsa that added a good kick to the tortilla. And, FYI, I polished off the marmalade on my toast!

This is one of those play with your food and cook without a recipe meals that I’d like to make another time.  Let’s hope memory and this posting kick in and make it as good a second time.

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Layer tortilla and eggs just beginning to set.
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Upside down tortilla showing meat layer now on top and melted cheese.
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Toast, a few grape tomatoes for color and two slices of Spanish-inspired breakfast tortilla. A wonderful salsa from my neighbor livens up the tortilla.

 

Taco Tome

Last Friday’s paper had a large article about a book promotion event for The Tacos of Texas, a newly released book by Jarod Neece and Mando Rayo, a former El Pasoan, both of whom now consider themselves taco journalists.  The book is the product of 7,000 miles of driving around Texas eating tacos, interviewing local taco eaters and recruiting members of the Texas Taco Council for the promotion and perpetuation of tacos.

fullsizeoutput_b90 The promotion event was free tacos in different styles by four different chefs. There were traditional tacos, Tex-Mex tacos and New Americano Tacos. The gates opened at noon and the lines ran out the gates and up the block at Memorial Park’s special activity area.

I didn’t not choose to wait in long lines for a free taco.   Instead, I had tacos and enchiladas at nearby Doña Lupe’s instead.  Afterwards, I returned to the park go find the lines still were long. The book buyer line was very short. Go figure – 45 or more minutes or in line in the sun for a taco or five minutes in line and $20 for a book.

img_2728 I purchased the book, waved goodbye to some friends in who’ve been in line line in the sun and headed home in the air conditioned comfort of my truck.

At home, I kicked back and read the introduction to the book and then skipped ahead to the chapter on El Paso. There are interviews with the owners and chefs at restaurants, taquerias and with local celebrities and just folks who know their way around a taco. Somehow, they failed to interview the Gringo Gourmet for the book

Each of the sections of the book follows this pattern of interviews and offers a list of five “bests” for tacos, based on the interviews. You’ll have to read the book to find out who is on the list!

Folks who read this blog know that there is a category called play with your food. Dishes there start with a basic premise and adapt it into something individual.  It evolved from reading Bon Appetit’s Cooking Without a Recipe feature on their e-mail feature series.  I use their model and list ingredients and tips on methodology if needed, but don’t create a formal recipe with things like quantities and measures.  It becomes a fun adventure for me and no one, so far, has complained or been harmed by my creations.

The book calls tortillas, fillings and salsa the trinity of tacos. It also says a taco can be anything served in a folded-over taco, the exception being taquitos which are rolled and fried tacos sometimes called flats, and what folks in the north and eastern parts of the state call a breakfast taco that looks suspiciously like an egg burrito to me.

The book does have recipes from each of the five “bests” in each locale and a few from the local celebrities. It will be fun to try some from the different regions of the state – even those bastions of Mexican food, Midland-Odessa, Abilene and Dallas.  I will give the authors credit for been unbiased-ish in their statewide taco tasting.

I am enjoying the book greatly. It is fun for foodies to read and to be inspired by some new approaches to tacos.

After a night of reading The Tacos of Texas I woke wanting a chile based breakfast. Here’s how the taco exposure affected a couple of breakfast favorites in this house – the Chile Relleno al Flojero (lazy man chile rellenos) and enchilada montages (stacked enchiladas with an egg on top).

Bye the book definition of a taco being a tortilla filled with something, my Relleno al Flojero must really be a cheese stuffed green chile taco.  It loses something in the translation, but the flavor is still there.

I usually use three tortillas for my breast enchiladas with egg.  But under the taco spell, I decided to fill the tortillas in half with a green chile, cheese, onion and dollop of red chile sauce, then top the taco looking enchilada with more red chile, onion and cheese.  I made two and added the requisite fried egg and christened it tacolada montada.  I think this breakfast will appear on the the table again soon, perhaps with a side of refried beans that the authors call Mexican mayonnaise.

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From the bottom” green chile and cheese taco AKA Chile relleno al flowers and tacoladas montadas – eggs topped cheese enchiladas folded like a taco instead of stacked – warning: tacoladas are not finger food.